If it weren’t for me, the average marathoners would be in last place…

14 Dec

So, it is a cold & rainy morning and I’m going to pick up the race bags for the whole family for this Saturday’s 5K.  You see, Don registers us all for a 5k every month.  It is fun for the whole family.   The only problem is that I have not been very motivated since last month’s 5k to do much running.   Oh, I got my excuses:  It is cold/raining/ozone depleted outside today.   I’m swamped with work/home/life/mindless blogging at the moment.  My hips/feet/head/tonsils (so what if they were removed when I was in 2nd grade – ever heard of phantom pain??) hurt.     

And, to make matters worse, after the last 5k I was heckled by my running clan that I was a slow runner – despite the fact that I did beat a 5 year old boy who was trying to outrun me at the last minute to the cheers of the onlookers (the little turd angel).   Nor did I get credit for taking in all the scenery – no one else seemed to notice that there was what must have been a haunted house on the route just past the house that had the big “CHICKEN SHACK” sign in the front yard.  How did they not notice these things?  I mean, really, who are they kidding, they weren’t running that fast.   And I got no respect for walking the second mile about 20 seconds faster than I ran the first mile – you would think that was worth some sort of affirmation.   You, oh sympathetic reader, can clearly see why I might be a bit discouraged.

So, as I’m want to do I turned to the internet for motivation, since it makes perfect sense to sit in front of the computer and read about running rather than actually lacing up your shoes and moving.    But as the fates would have it, in my moment of despair, I came across this article that reminded me that my slow (and you can take that for complete, total, 100% face value – you might even look up synonyms for “slow” and add a few to this post for good measure) attempt at movement is actually a ministry to others.   For if I were not at the back of the pack, then all those average runners would be.   And really, I’m not sure their self-esteem could handle it.

Check it out and be inspired:

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/03/health/03well.html

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5 Responses to “If it weren’t for me, the average marathoners would be in last place…”

  1. Kerri December 14, 2009 at 10:50 pm #

    do you realize what we are offering the world by our willingness to run that marathon? seriously, people will feel so much better about themselves simply by our mere presence.

    we are givers. simple as that. givers.

  2. Lauren June 9, 2010 at 12:30 pm #

    if you want to run with me in hawaii, I can probably make you feel tons better about your speed.
    fact: when don talks about the marathon he always says i got hurt around mile 7. as a matter of pride i just let him think that, but my ankle didn’t hurt until mile 13. i just run that slow. my excuse for running slow now is that i had a baby so if i run too fast i [THE REST OF THIS SENTANCE WAS DELETED AT POSTERS REQUEST, BUT IF YOU HAVE HAD A BABY, YOU COULD FILL IN THE BLANK HERE WITH A MILLION AND ONE EXCUSES ON HER BEHALF AND BE TOTALLY EMPATHETIC TO HER PLIGHT – No Kidding. sld]. i got a million of ’em though if you run out of material.

  3. Lauren June 9, 2010 at 12:30 pm #

    umm, crap. can everyone read my response?? if so, then please find someone to omit the [DELETED] bit. thank you in advance for your cooperation.

  4. SLD February 8, 2011 at 9:04 pm #

    This whole thing still makes me grin.

  5. Purveyor of Pixie Dust January 1, 2014 at 10:29 am #

    Reblogged this on Purveyor of Pixie Dust and commented:

    In honor of everyone making resolutions to get out and run more…this one is an oldie but a goodie. Keep running!

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